Eva Szentirmai

 

észentirmai@wsu.edu
509-358-7821

SHSB 280 J
Washington State University
Spokane, WA 99210-1495

« MEDICAL SCIENCE FACULTY & STAFF HOME

Éva Szentirmai, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
WSU Medical Sciences


Education
M.D., University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, Hungary

Ph.D., University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, Hungary

Teaching
Microscopic Anatomy
Nervous System

Research
The focus of Dr. Éva Szentirmai’s research is on neuronal circuits that are involved in regulating sleep-wake activity, feeding and metabolism. The purpose of her research is to understand how the brain uses metabolic and hormonal signals from the gastrointestinal tract and the hypothalamus to control sleep and coordinate metabolism and vigilance. Specifically, her laboratory investigates the role of the hypothalamic ghrelin-neuropeptide Y-orexin circuit and the brown adipose tissue in the regulation of sleep-wake activity and metabolism.

Additional Information
Szentirmai is an assistant professor and researcher with the WWAMI Medical Education Program at WSU Spokane. She is also affiliated with the Department of Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology and Physiology, as well as the Sleep and Performance Research Center in Spokane.

She received her Doctor of Medicine and doctorate in philosophy from the University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, in Hungary. She started her post-doctoral training in the Department of Physiology at the same university. In 2005, Szentirmai joined Dr. James Krueger’s sleep research lab at Washington State University Pullman, where she continued her post-doctoral research on the neurobiology of sleep. Szentirmai joined the WWAMI faculty in 2009, she teaches first-year students and conducts research.

Selected Publications
Szentirmai É
. (2012) Central but not systemic administration of ghrelin induces wakefulness in mice, PLoS One,7:e41172.

Pellinen J, Szentirmai É. (2012) The Effects of C75, an Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Synthase, on Sleep and Metabolism in Mice. PLoS One, 7: e30651.

Esposito M, Pellinen J, Kapás L and Szentirmai É. (2012) Impaired Wake-Promoting Mechanisms in Ghrelin Receptor Deficient Mice. Eur. J. Neurosci, 35: 233-243.

Szentirmai É., Kapás L., Sun Y., Smith R.G., Krueger J.M. (2010) Restricted feeding-Induced sleep, activity and body temperature changes in normal and preproghrelin deficient mice. Am J Physiol. 298(2):R467-77.

Szentirmai É., Kapás L., Sun Y., Smith R.G., Krueger J.M. (2009) The preproghrelin gene is required for normal integration of thermoregulation and sleep in mice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 106(33):14069-14074.

Szentirmai É., Kapás L., Sun Y., Smith R.G., Krueger J.M. (2007) Spontaneous sleep and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout mice. Am J Physiol 293(1): R510-R517.

Szentirmai É., Kapás L., Krueger J.M. (2007) Ghrelin micro injection into fore-brain sites induces wakefulness and feeding in rats. Am J Physiol 292(1): R575-R585.

Szentirmai É., Hajdu I., Obál F. Jr., Krueger J.M. (2006) Ghrelin-induced sleep responses in ad libitum fed and food-restricted rats. Brain Res 1088: 131-140.

More publications »