• AUDIOLOGISTS
  • SPEECH
    LANGUAGE
    PATHOLOGISTS

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WHAT DO AUDIOLOGISTS DO?

Audiologists specialize in prevention, identification, assessment, and rehabilitation of hearing disorders, including:

  • Performing diagnostic evaluations of hearing and function of the hearing mechanisms.
  • Prescribing hearing aids.
  • Developing and implementing hearing conservation programs for employees in their workplace.
  • Using computer technology developed to assist those with severe communication disabilities.
  • Participating as part of the implant team for cochlear implants.
  • Providing aural rehabilitation for individuals learning to use hearing aids and cochlear implants.
  • Participating in research and development of new products.
  • Teaching and supervising future audiologists.

Technology developed to assist those with severe communication disabilities and cochlear implants, which bypass damaged inner ear mechanisms, are among the most exciting clinical advances in the field.

Examples of where audiologists and speech pathologists work:

  • Hospitals and rehabilitation centers.
  • Nursing care facilities and community clinics.
  • Colleges and universities.
  • Private practice offices.
  • State and local health departments.
  • State and federal government agencies.
  • Home health agencies (home care).
  • Long-term facilities.
  • Adult day care centers.
  • Research laboratories and institutes.
  • Private industry.
  • Nonprofit clinics.
  • Public and private schools.

WHAT DO SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS DO?

  • Training with alternative/augmentative communication devices for those with limited ability to verbally communicate
  • Aural rehabilitation for individuals who are hearing impaired
  • Treatment for articulation errors
  • Provide therapy to individuals with delayed language development
  • Early intervention among preschoolers
  • Work with children to improve language skills and academic performance
  • Treat people who have experienced a stroke or brain trauma to regain language and speech functions
  • Assist individuals who are experiencing swallowing difficulties
  • Assist individuals in developing proper control of the vocal and respiratory systems for correct voice production
  • Counsel individuals and families to better cope with speech and language disorders
  • Help those who stutter to increase fluency
  • Participate in clinical (applied) and/or basic research related to speech-language disorders and their effects
  • Teach and supervise future speech-language pathologists

Examples of where audiologists and speech pathologists work:

  • Hospitals and rehabilitation centers.
  • Nursing care facilities and community clinics.
  • Colleges and universities.
  • Private practice offices.
  • State and local health departments.
  • State and federal government agencies.
  • Home health agencies (home care).
  • Long-term facilities.
  • Adult day care centers.
  • Research laboratories and institutes.
  • Private industry.
  • Nonprofit clinics.
  • Public and private schools.

Our Speech-Language Pathologists in the News:

Geogrina Lynch Joins Expert Panel Discussion on PBS Health Matters: "Understanding Autism” (December 2012)

SPEECH & HEARING SCIENCES BROCHURE

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CONTACT US

Main Office:
Health Sciences Building, room 125X

Undergraduate Program
509-358-7513
speechhearing@wsu.edu

Graduate Program
509-358-7602
stephend@wsu.edu