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Counseling Services

AWARE Network – Early Intervention

Are you concerned about a student’s physical or mental health? Has a student’s behavior caused you to worry about his or her potential actions?

The AWARE Network allows you to share concerns about a student’s emotional or psychological well-being, physical health, or academic performance with colleagues who can help.

Warning signs
Changes in a student’s style and level of functioning are often indicators of distress. The suddenness and extent of change may reflect the severity of the difficulty.

Faculty & staff should be aware of:

  • Assignments not being turned in, or turned in late
  • A change in frequency of absences from class
  • Disinterest, apathy, and hopelessness
  • Disruptiveness in class (e.g. angry outbursts, acting out)
  • Excessive emotional content in discussing or writing class materials
  • Mention of suicide or homicide in the content of coursework
  • Significant decline or deficit in self-care behaviors,(e.g. personal hygiene, extreme weight loss)
  • Noticeable changes in personality or behavior
  • Significant paranoia regarding government, law enforcement, administration, etc

Fellow students should be aware of:

  • Communicating threats against self, others, or the campus
  • Fantasizing about harm to self, others, or the campus
  • Aggressive behavior or speech
  • Frequent mentioning of or discussion about death
  • Increase in substance use/abuse
  • Disinterest, apathy, and hopelessness
  • Social withdrawal

WSU Spokane Counseling Service

  • Confidential counseling
  • No cost to students
  • Personal, family and relationship concerns
  • Crisis services, including suicide prevention

Immediate Mental Health Emergencies: In these instances, call 911 immediately.

Signs that the student may be experiencing a mental health emergency and, potentially, in danger of harm to self or others include:

  • Direct suicidal or homicidal statements
  • Bizarre speech
  • Loss of contact with reality
  • Extreme anxiety; panic
Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane