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How Mindfulness Reduces Stress

By: Tracy L. Skaer, Pharm.D., Professor of Pharmacotherapy
College of Pharmacy, Washington State University

Jon-Kabat-Zinn describes mindfulness as, “the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, nonjudgmentally to the unfolding experience moment by moment.” Mindfulness has been found to reduce stress as well as gradually building inner strength to ensure that future stressful situations have less impact on our physical and emotional well-being.
Mindfulness reduces stress by: » More …

Can We Control Stress?

By: Naomi Chaytor, PhD, ABPP, Associate Professor
Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University

Dr. Chaytor is a clinical psychologist with expertise in brain-behavior relationships (how our brains take in our world and produce emotions, thinking and other behavior). She was a practicing clinical neuropsychologist at UW Medicine for 11 years working with patients with neurological illness and injury.  She conducted evaluations of patients in order to better understand the cognitive and emotional consequences of brain changes and help them return to work, school or home. She also did short-term problem focused psychotherapy helping patients adjust to their illness or injury. » More …

How introverts can coexist with extroverts

By: Michael Ebinger, PhD, MBA, Director of Innovation WSU

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time.” 

This quote by F. Scott Fitzgerald came to mind during my last bicycle commute to campus on a chilly November morning.  It summarizes a dichotomy that many of us work with:  how do introverts succeed in an extrovert’s world?  Resolving this question creates many opportunities to refine and grow intellectually.    » More …

Tips for managing stress

By Tracy Skaer, WSU College of Pharmacy

There are two categories of stress: eustress and distress. Eustress is the beneficial type that helps motivate our lives and keep us happy, connected, active, challenged, motivated and productive. However, when stress becomes intolerable and/or manageable then detrimental distress becomes apparent. Distress leads to several negative outcomes including poor decision making, anxiety, insomnia, irritability, increases in blood pressure, indigestion, hyperventilation, reduced or increased appetite, substance abuse, and poor coping skills.

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Logging Off: Technology and Sleep

By: Michael Winser, Registered Polysomnographic Technologist, WSU Spokane Sleep and Performance Research Center

In a world where technology keeps us always logged on, it has become harder and harder to log off. In 2011, the National Sleep Foundation Sleep in America poll found that most people (86%) are using technology like mobile phones, computers and TVs every single night in the hour before bed. While we may feel more productive or more in touch by using technology before going to sleep, we might be setting ourselves up for being less productive and more out of touch the following day.

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