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Grant and Contract Awards

FY2018, 3rd Quarter Summary
(January 1 – March 31, 2018)

Scroll down to read, or use these links to jump directly to a section/principal investigator (PI):

 

NEW & TRANSFER AWARDS

(New grants, funding transferred from a PI’s previous institution, and NIH competitive renewal funding)

Celestina Barbosa-Leiker (PI); Maria Gartstein; Alyson Blum; Michele Shaw – College of Nursing; College of Arts and Sciences, Dept. of Psychology; College of Pharmacy
WSU Office of Research; Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program
“Cannabis Use during Pregnancy: First Look at Effects on Maternal-child Health”
This is an internal award for a pilot project related to cannabis use during pregnancy. As part of this study, the researchers will identify perceptions of risks and benefits of cannabis use both before and after childbirth. They will also look at addiction-related functional impairment, infant temperament, and mother-infant interactions for women that used cannabis daily versus those who used it occasionally while pregnant. The study results will help better educate healthcare providers and pregnant women on the possible risks of cannabis use around childbirth, inform maternal and infant health policy, and improve standards of care.

Chris Blodgett (PI) – WSU Extension, Child and Family Research Unit
Juneau Community Foundation
“Juneau CLEAR Schools Pilot Project”
This award funds the WSU Child and Family Research Unit’s assistance with the implementation of the CLEAR (Collaborative Learning for Educational Achievement and Resilience) trauma-informed school response model in three elementary schools in the Juneau School District in Alaska. The goal of the project is to maximize the potential for school success for all children by addressing the needs of children who have experienced multiple traumatic events, such as homelessness, parents’ divorce or separation, and exposure to domestic violence.

Chris Blodgett (PI) – WSU Extension, Child and Family Research Unit
Allcare Health
“Grants Pass School District – Parkside Elementary CLEAR”
This award funds the implementation of Collaborative Learning for Educational Achievement and Resilience (CLEAR) trauma-informed school response model in the Grants Pass School District’s Parkside Elementary School in southwestern Oregon. Developed by the WSU Child and Family Research Unit (CAFRU), CLEAR is a whole-school change model that helps educators and other school professionals recognize, understand, and deal with the effects of children’s exposure to harmful experiences, such as abuse, neglect, homelessness, and domestic violence. Implementation of CLEAR will be done through on-site monthly consultation and professional development trainings provided by CAFRU staff.

Dedra Buchwald (PI); Michael McDonell; Clemma Muller; Sterling McPherson; Amanda Boyd; Lonnie Nelson –Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine/College of Nursing/Community Health; Murrow College of Communication
National Institutes of Health; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
“Native Center for Alcohol Research and Education”
This is a five-year grant that funds the establishment of the Native Center for Alcohol Research and Education at WSU, in partnership with the University of Colorado Denver and the University of Washington. The center will offer research programs to identify and promote effective preventive interventions tailored to Native infants, youth, and adults in urban, rural, and frontier communities. The goal is to reduce the profound alcohol-related health disparities experienced by this underserved population and improve the quality of life of Native people with alcohol use disorders, their families, and their communities.

Devon Grant (PI) – Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine/Sleep and Performance Research Center
Institute for Translational Health Sciences/National Institutes of Health
“Naturalistic Monitoring and Treatment for Insomnia”
This study will test the effectiveness of a novel sleep tracking system in individuals with chronic insomnia (those whose sleep is disrupted at least three nights a week for more than three months). The technology consists of a non-contact sensor that sits next to a sleeper’s bed and measures timing quantity, and quality of sleep. It pairs with a smartphone app that shows users details on their sleep and uses built-in coaching functionality to provide individualized suggestions for improving sleep. The study will compare the effectiveness of the technology’s built-in coaching functionality in treating in insomnia, comparing it to participation in an online program for cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, the current standard of treatment for chronic insomnia.

Doreen Hauser-Lindstrom (PI); Christine Knoefler; Shannon Rowley; Loretta Van Anrooy; Cynthia Rosenow – WSU Extension
Spokane Regional Health District
“SNAP-Ed FFY18-20 – Region 1”
This is funding for a project that provides nutrition education and obesity prevention services to individuals and families eligible for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) assistance in the following counties that make up region 1: Adams, Ferry, Grant, Mason, Pend Oreille, Spokane, and Stevens Counties.

Louise Kaplan (PI); Janessa Graves; Tracy Klein; Marian Wilson – College of Nursing
WSU Office of Research; Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program
“Knowledge, Practices and Attitudes Regarding Marijuana for Medical Conditions Among Washington State Healthcare Providers and Certified Marijuana Consultants”

This pilot study will evaluate and compare knowledge, practices, and attitudes regarding use of marijuana for medical conditions from health care providers and consultants who convey information on marijuana to patients. The researchers will survey health care professionals and medical marijuana consultants—a role unique to Washington State—regarding medical marijuana, their knowledge of the legal requirements of the law, and sources of information they consult regarding medical marijuana use. The goal of the study is to obtain data to inform strategies addressing knowledge and practice gaps regarding the use of marijuana for medical conditions and to inform further research and the development of decision-making tools for health care providers and marijuana consultants.

Michael McDonell (PI) – Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine/Community Health
University of California San Francisco/National Institutes of Health, NIAAA
Interventions to reduce alcohol use and increase adherence to TB preventive therapy amount HIV/TB co-infected drinkers”
People with HIV worldwide are at a higher risk of being infected with tuberculosis (TB). That risk is three times as high in those with HIV who are heavy drinkers, compared to non-drinkers. Six months of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) has been shown to reduce TB and mortality by 30 to 50 percent above the positive impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART), however there are issues related to liver toxicity and poor adherence to ART and IPT in those who drink. This award funds a study that will investigate whether use of economic incentives to reduce alcohol use can decrease toxicity and increase IPT completion. The study will look at 800 individuals in Uganda with HIV and TB infection and heavy alcohol use. The study will compare changes in alcohol use and IPT adherence after six months across four randomized participant groups: participants in the control group will not receive any incentives. One group will receive economic incentives for decreasing alcohol use only; another will receive economic incentives for IPT adherence only; and a final group will receive economic incentives for both decreasing alcohol use and IPT adherence, independently.

Kimberly McKeirnan (PI); Julie Akers – College of Pharmacy
Cardinal Health
“Cardinal InPower Home Visit Pilot Project”
This award provides funding for a yearlong pilot project to test the impact of the Cardinal InPower Personal Medication Assistant system on patient medication adherence and health outcomes. In partnership with Well Life Pharmacies—a Spokane County-based chain of community pharmacies—the research team will study 30 patients who are considered high-risk patients and who have previously received home visits to see whether these visits may improve adherence and outcomes.

Sterling McPherson (PI); Crystal Lederhos Smith – Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine
WSU Office of Research; Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program
“Predictors of Cannabis and Tobacco Co-Use Using the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study”
This award funds a study aimed at better understanding factors that influence the concurrent use of cannabis and tobacco—two of the most frequently used psychoactive substances in the world. Compared to users of either substance by itself, users of cannabis and tobacco are at higher risk of respiratory distress, reduced lung functioning, psychosocial problems, and potentially some forms of cancer. In addition, the use of either substance increases the likelihood that a person will start using the other. The researchers will use data on 13,651 youth aged 12 to 17 who participate in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, an ongoing, longitudinal cohort study. They will determine lifetime and recent use of cannabis and tobacco, look for demographic and other factors that could product cannabis and tobacco co-use, and explore whether age at first use for either substance influences the identified predictors of cannabis/tobacco co-use in any way.

Michele Shaw; Janet Katz (co-PIs); Crystal Lederhos Smith; Marian Wilson; Celestina Barbosa-Leiker – College of Nursing
WSU Office of Research; Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program
 “Youth Perceptions of Marijuana Use: A Grounded Theory Exploration”
Cultural attitudes around marijuana use are beginning to shift, as evidenced by declining rates of perceived harm related to the use of marijuana among youth. This is a major concern, because studies have demonstrated that the earlier in life marijuana use is initiated, the greater the likelihood of numerous negative health and psychosocial consequences. This award funds a pilot project to identify and describe factors involved in youth perceptions of marijuana use and develop an explanatory grounded theory based on these factors. It will use in-home interviews to collect data from approximately 20 youth, ages 12 to 18. The project will provide a basis for the development and implementation of interventions to decrease and prevent marijuana use among youth.

Jonathan Wisor (PI); Barbara Sorg Ingermann – Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine; WSU Vancouver
National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Sleep Deprivation Elevates, and Sleep Alleviates, Oxidative Stress in the Brain”
Sleep is essential for the reversal of deficits in cognition and performance that build up during wakefulness. Scientists have known that brain metabolism slows down during sleep, which is shown by a decline in brain temperature and the brain’s decreased use of glucose and oxygen. It is believed that this metabolic down state is essential for the restorative function of sleep, but scientists are not sure what biochemical processes underlie this relationship. This project will seek to establish a causal relationship between sleep/wake cycles and brain redox status—the balance of oxidation and reduction reactions in the brain—and will identify brain oxidation/reduction reactions that could be targeted for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.

Boyang Wu (PI) – College of Pharmacy
U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Army, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program
“Targeting Neuromimicry in Prostate Cancer Metastasis”
This concerns the transfer of funding from the PI’s previous institution for a project related to prostate cancer, the second most common cause of cancer death in US men of all ages and the most common in those older than 75. The project seeks to address a lack of effective treatments for patients with advanced stage prostate cancer that has metastasized, or spread, to other parts of the body. The study looks at prostate cancer that spreads through nerves, which has been correlated with worse outcomes and decreased survival in prostate cancer patients. It builds on a recent discovery that prostate cancer cells express genes that are normally restricted to nerve cells. Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA)—a key brain enzyme that controls brain, function, mood, and behavior—is expressed at higher rates in metastatic prostate cancer patient samples, and the increase is more significant in samples in which prostate cancer spreads through the nerves. MAOA also activates other genes responsible for the growth and movement of nerve cells in prostate cancer cell models. It is thought that by expressing these genes and exhibiting nerve-like behavior, prostate cancer cells are able to mimic and communicate with nerves to promote prostate cancer spread in and along nerves. This study will seek to determine the process by which MAOA and its downstream genes mediate the interactions between prostate cancer cells and nerves. In addition, it will determine the effectiveness of MAOA inhibitor drugs—which are currently used as antidepressants—in treating prostate cancer metastasis in rodent models. This may eventually lead to new treatment strategies for advanced-stage prostate cancer.

AWARDS FOR ONGOING WORK

(Renewal, continued, and supplemental funding for projects awarded previously)

Chris Blodgett (PI) – WSU Extension, Child and Family Research Unit
Public Health of Seattle and King County/Gates Foundation
“Seattle Elementary School Mental Health Initiative”
This is renewal grant funding for the WSU Child and Family Research Unit to help Public Health – Seattle & King County implement its trauma intervention program in two elementary schools within Seattle Public Schools. The goal of the project is to maximize the potential for school success for all children by addressing the needs of children who have experienced multiple traumatic events, such as homelessness, parents’ divorce or separation, and exposure to domestic violence.

John Clarke (PI) – College of Pharmacy
National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
“Microcystin-LR Toxicity in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis”
This project will help improve the scientific understanding of the interaction between liver disease and exposure to toxic substances in the environment. Specifically, it will seek to understand how the liver disease nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) alters the toxicokinetics and toxicity of the waterborne toxin microcystin‐LR (MCLR). NASH—the most severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease—is estimated to be present in 5 to 17 percent of U.S. adults. In addition to the liver problems these patients face, they also have higher rates of chronic kidney disease, which may be associated with exposure to MCLR. MCLR is a common toxin produced by blue-green algae found in sources of drinking water around the world. Preliminary studies conducted by Clarke showed that MCLR exposure in NASH dramatically increases kidney toxicity compared to healthy controls exposed to MCLR. This new study tests the hypothesis, based on the earlier work, that people with NASH are at increased risk of altered MCLR exposure and MCLR‐induced kidney toxicity due to changes in liver uptake transporters known as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP).

Doreen Hauser-Lindstrom (PI); Jennifer Hey – WSU Extension Youth & Families
Washington State Department of Health; Department of Social and Health Services
“SNAP-Ed FFY18-20 – Region 5 – Mason County”
This is supplemental funding for a project that provides nutrition education and obesity prevention services to individuals and families eligible for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) assistance in Mason County.

James Krueger (PI); Ping Taishi – College of Veterinary Medicine
National Institutes of Health; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
“Interleukin-1: A Promoter of Slow Wave Sleep”
This is continued funding for a five-year project to characterize the role of interleukin-1β (IL1) in sleep regulation and brain plasticity and repair processes. As part of the study, the researchers will describe IL1 sleep signaling mechanisms, including the role of the neuron-specific IL1 receptor accessory protein (AcPb) in physiological sleep.

Matthew Layton (PI); Raymond Quock; Marian Wilson – Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine; College of Arts and Sciences, Dept. of Psychology; College of Nursing
WSU Office of Research; Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program
“Influence of Hyperbaric Oxygen on Withdrawal Signs and Symptoms in Human Subjects with Opioid Dependence”
These are continued funds for a clinical study to determine whether hyperbaric oxygen can relieve signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal in human subjects who are undergoing opioid dose reductions or are on opioid tapering plans. Subjects will be recruited from the Spokane Regional Health District Opioid Treatment Program. They will be randomized into two groups—a group that will receive a five-day medically supervised hyperbaric oxygen treatment and a control group. Preliminary data from this study will used to apply for funding for a larger clinical trial to test the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen in relieving opioid withdrawal in humans.

Lonnie Nelson (PI); Emma Elliott-Groves; Dedra Buchwald; Clemma Muller – College of Nursing/Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine/WSU Spokane/Community Health
University of New Mexico/National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging
Rhythm and Timing Exercises for Cerebral Vascular Disease in American Indians – Diversity Supplement”
This is a diversity supplement that provides funding to add a Native scholar—Dr. Emma Elliott-Groves—to the WSU team assisting the University of New Mexico with a study on cerebrovascular disease in American Indians. The goal of the study is to determine whether culturally adapted interactive metronome therapy can improve cognitive function among older American Indians with cerebrovascular disease. Interactive metronome is a form of behavioral therapy that attempts to improve cognitive functioning through mass-practice of simple, repetitive millisecond timing motor tasks—such as clapping hands or tapping feet—in time with a set beat. Through visual and auditory feedback, interactive metronome addresses processing speed, attention, and immediate and delayed memory, all of which can be affected by cerebrovascular disease.

Mary Paine (PI) – College of Pharmacy
National Institutes of Health, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health
“Administrative Supplement to U54AT008909: Mechanistic In Vitro Goldenseal-Drug Interaction Studies”
This is supplemental funding for the multidisciplinary Center of Excellence on Natural Product‐Drug Interactions Research, which is led by WSU in collaboration with the University of Washington and University of North Carolina at Greensboro. It funds studies aimed at uncovering the mechanisms that underlie natural product-drug interactions involving goldenseal, a natural product used to treat symptoms of the common cold and numerous digestive disorders. The information gained will be used to develop models to predict the likelihood and magnitude of potential adverse interactions between goldenseal and conventional medications.

Éva Szentirmai (PI); Weihang Chai; Levente Kapas; Kenneth Roberts – Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine/Sleep and Performance Research Center
National Institutes of Health; National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
Brown Adipose Tissue and Sleep Regulation”
This award represents continued funds for a study on how brown fat interacts with our brains to regulate sleep. Brown fat is a beneficial fat that helps burn the calories stored in white fat and regulates our body temperature. In previous studies, decreased brown fat activity was associated with less sleep and less deep sleep. This work could open the door to new drugs to combat obesity, metabolic syndrome, and chronic sleep loss.