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DOCTOR OF EDUCATION IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

The statewide Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) Program in Educational Leadership is designed as a cohort-based program focusing on the theme of leadership for school improvement. Program participants are part of a learning community dedicated to enhancing educational leadership practice to improve schools and promote the learning of all children. The program has several unique features:

Statewide program delivery

Program participants can access courses and work with advisers through all of WSU’s campuses (Pullman, Spokane, Vancouver, Tri-Cities). Through careful sequencing of program offerings, participants at all campuses can work in local cohort groups and complete all requirements within a four-year time frame.

A practitioner-scholar approach

Program content combines the best of both worlds—issues important to practicing school leaders and the scholarship that can help to analyze and address these issues. Program faculty blends the strengths of academic scholars and practitioners; while several faculty members are highly successful, experienced administrators, others are highly regarded academic scholars. Both contribute to the central purpose of the program, to prepare practitioner-scholars for leadership for school improvement.

Summer inquiry institutes

To augment the program offerings available at each campus, participants from around the state attend two-week summer institutes on the Pullman campus. These institutes help build a learning community and support network among the statewide cohort. Institute participants share their leadership experiences and challenges, plan collaborative inquiry around problems of practice, and benefit from working with a wider range of educational leadership faculty. The institute is designed to help students move toward completion of their dissertation research.

Alignment with certification programs

The statewide Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program is closely aligned with WSU’s field-based superintendent certification program. Students who have completed the superintendent program can apply all credits toward the Ed.D. program of study. However, participation in the superintendent program is not a requirement for the Ed.D.; program offerings are carefully sequenced to allow all participants to complete the program together as members of the statewide cohort, both those enrolled in the superintendent program and those who are not.

Program overview

The statewide Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program is designed as a cohort-based, four-year program, offered through all WSU campuses. Students apply for admission to any regional campus by January 10, to join a statewide cohort admitted to begin each summer/fall. Once admitted, students may access course offerings and advisement through any of WSU’s campuses. Courses are carefully sequenced to allow students at all campuses to work in local cohort groups and complete the program within a four- to five-year time frame.

In addition to program offerings at the regional campuses, students attend two-week summer institutes at the Pullman campus for two consecutive summers, after completion of at least 12 graded credithours including a research methods course (typically EdResy 563). The purpose of the summer institutes is to build a learning community and support network among the state-wide cohort, and to form inquiry groups that will focus dissertation research on common problems of leadership for school improvement. During the fourth year of the sequence, students are enrolled full-time in dissertation research (EdAd 800).

The Program of Study for completion of the Ed.D. requires aminimum of 72 semester hours, including at least 42 semester hours of graded coursework and at least 20 semester hours of EdAd 800—Dissertation Research.

Up to 12 semester hours on the Program of Study may be transferred from other accredited programs or from the student’s master’s degree, if approved by the faculty. Continuous enrollment in EdAd 800 (at least two credits each semester) is required while students are completing the dissertation.

Students work with an advisor to create an approved Program of Study.

Application Process
(Priority application deadline: January 10 for Summer/Fall 2013)

Applications for the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership are accepted each year by January 10, for a summer/fall semester start. Enclosed you will find the necessary application materials and instructions. It is important to note that applying is a multi-step process and often takes several weeks to complete. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

  • First, you must apply to the WSU Graduate School for acceptance to the university.
  • Second, you must submit supplemental information to the department for acceptance into the degree program.

For application information, please refer to the Checklist and Instructions for Admission Requirements provided with the application.

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (Ed.D.) TEACHER LEADERSHIP

As a concentration in a larger Ed.D. Program at Washington State University, the Teacher Leadership Doctorate has been designed to prepare K-16 teachers and practitioners for intellectual and practical leadership within classrooms, schools, districts, communities, teaching and/or community colleges, agencies, and the larger educational policy arena. As part of a multi-campus program, students can access courses on one of four home campuses during the academic year. In order to develop collaborative opportunities across the cohort, all students participate in a two-week summer institute held on the Pullman campus. This combination of face-to-face and distance delivery models offers an opportunity for educators to develop support systems with peers and faculty throughout the state.

The program itself involves a total of 72 credit hours. The 42 graded credits are distributed within of a minimum of five research courses, two educational foundations courses, at least five teacher leadership courses (two required and three each within a choice of four teacher leadership academic emphases), and additional electives. In the research strand, students learn not only to become critical consumers of research and skilled analysts who are able to interpret, report, and make practical applications of data sets (e.g., MSP scores, AYP, etc.), but also to generate and write about theory and engage in dissertation work. The two foundational courses focus on educational history, curriculum, and cultural identity. The Teacher Leadership strand provides students a common framework from which to examine past and current practices. Students take courses on inquiry into teaching and adult learning. They also select at least three additional courses that provide a current understanding of content knowledge from existing Ph.D. programs within the following areas: cultural/curriculum studies, English as a Second Language, math and science education, and/or special education. 

In addition, students complete a minimum of 20 ungraded 800-level credits as they complete their preliminary exam, dissertation proposal, and actual dissertation. Students can choose from a range of dissertation types, including traditional written dissertations, to action research, to art-based dissertations. For additional credits, students may take ungraded internships or possibly receive credit for previously completed coursework.

Throughout the program, the emphasis is on helping working professionals to develop an inquiry stance toward the problems of and possibilities for education in their own settings, and to pursue inquiry through collaboration and leadership.  Ultimately, the program prepares teacher leaders who learn the educational tools, communication skills, and cultural awareness to engage in and promote change and praxis within a rapidly changing educational and social landscape.

The curriculum

Research strand (15 credits, five courses)

Research infuses all courses; the program includes a minimum of 15 credits in research methodology.  Throughout the program, the emphasis is on helping working professionals to develop an inquiry stance toward the problems of and possibilities for education in their own settings, and to pursue inquiry through collaboration and leadership.

The goals for the research strand include enabling students to be critical consumers of research, skilled analysts who are able to interpret, report, and make practical applications of data sets (e.g., WASL scores, AYP, etc.), and competent researchers who are prepared for their dissertation work, including understanding the principles of research design, multiple methodologies, interpretation of data and findings, and writing skills appropriate for academic work.  Three of the five courses are shared across the three statewide Ed.D. specializations; two are specific to the teacher leadership specialization.

Foundations of Education (6 credits, two courses)

All students in the College of Education’s Ed.D. programs will take a course in the history of education and education reform and another focusing on diversity, race, and culture, both examining issues at all (p-20) levels of schooling.

Teacher Leadership Core (15 credits, five courses)

The Teacher Leadership Core will provide a common framework from which to examine past and current practices.  All participants will begin their programs with a course on inquiry into teaching.  All will additionally complete study in adult learning to contextualize research and leadership practice.  Students will select at least three additional courses that provide a current understanding of content knowledge from the following disciplines: curriculum theory, language (ESL) and literacy, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education, special education.  This knowledge will serve to both frame and support students’ inquiries in the research courses and summer session core courses as well as in the dissertation.

Electives (six credits)

Electives provide students the opportunity to “customize” their Ed.D.  Students may take courses in school administration or additional discipline-specific courses from the Teacher Leadership Core.  They may also opt for graded internship credits.

The courses will include a field-based, action orientation.  With a focus on the diverse contexts of practicing professionals, participants will work collaboratively and individually to examine personal and institutional challenges through the lenses of current research, policy analysis, and opportunities for change.  Because participants from the ELCP department’s two statewide Ed.D. specializations will share some of the same courses, the program additionally  offers cross-specialization and collaboration opportunities as well as efficiencies to departmental scheduling and staffing options for courses.

The summer institutes

In summers I and II (required), participants will take two complementary, core courses.  During the first summer, required for program initiation, students will take Research in Teaching (focused on participants’ own questions about the profession based on personal experience) and Action Research.  These courses will be intertwined around the concept of individual and large-scale change in education.  During the second summer, students will take Program Evaluation and Adult Learning & Development, which will both explore how programs and policies interact with teacher professional development as well as broader adult development issues.  The third summer is optional and will provide time to complete elective courses on various campuses.  During Summer IV, students will work on dissertation proposals/research.  It is possible for students to move through the program by participating in intensive summer experiences and three years of part-time coursework and research during the academic year.  It is also possible for students to move more slowly through the program.  Note that the Graduate School requires that doctoral students finish their programs within ten years.

Comprehensive exams

Participants will formally work on their comprehensive exams during Summer IV.  The exam will require a final product that facilitates development of the dissertation proposal.

The dissertation

Participants will choose from several organized, statewide research projects (reflecting research needs identified by the state’s school district leaders) as topics for their dissertations or they may elect an individualized project.  Possibilities could include more traditional written dissertations, to piloted curriculum products, to film.  Regardless of the format selected, underlying learning outcomes of the final product will be similar and will include clear reflection of major learning themes from the Ed.D. program.

Learning outcomes

Goals and objectives of the doctoral programs in Teaching & Learning

Goals of all doctoral programs in the department:

  1. To guide students in their development as professionals in their chosen fields related to teaching and learning.
  2. To prepare students to be skilled and knowledgeable educational researchers/consumers of research.
  3. To establish themselves as highly successful programs that are recognized for the quality of their graduates and their statewide/national/international visibility.

The objectives associated with each goal are these:

  1. To guide students in their development as professionals in their chosen fields related to departmental expertise.  The programs

    • provide students with effective mentoring.
    • provide students with a variety of options for meeting their individual goals (coursework, internships, teaching/research assistantships, independent research opportunities, etc.)
    • provide students with opportunities to grow into effective researchers and disseminators of research.
  2. To prepare students to be skilled and knowledgeable educational researchers/consumers of research. Program graduates

    • locate, analyze, and synthesize research literature, and apply that synthesis to problems of practices and/or theory.
    • effectively communicate scholarly work through written, oral, and/or alternate formats.
    • skillfully inquire into areas of program-related interest.
    • develop scholarly habits of curiosity, inquiry, skepticism, and data-based decision making.
    • conduct and disseminate original scholarship that demonstrates acquisition and application of new knowledge and theory.
    • become emerging experts in their field of study.
  3. To Establish itself as a highly successful program that is recognized for the quality of its graduates and its statewide/national/international visibility. The programs

    • attract, secure, and retain high quality students.
    • graduate students who are satisfied with the professional preparation they have received.
    • graduate students who attain appropriate employment.
    • maintain an excellent on-time graduation record.
    • are delivered by a high quality graduate faculty that actively contributes to the program and scholarship that adds to the knowledge base of one of the program specializations.

Statewide education doctorate (Ed.D.) program course requirements

Research

15 graded credits

EdRes 563*  Principles of Research
EdRes 564* Qualitative Research
EdRes 565*   Quantitative Research-Pre-req Intro to statistics
T&L 588** Action Research   
EdPsy 570** Program Evaluation 

Foundations Core

6 graded credits

EdAd522* History of School Reform
T&L 589* Race, Identity, and Representation in Education

Teacher Leadership

 15 graded credits

Required Courses:

T&L 560**              Research in Teaching
T&L 596** Topics in Inservice Education: Adult Learning

Select at least three:

EdAd 514   Basic Principles of Curriculum Design
T&L 557 Research in Reading
T&L 550 Second Language Learning and Literacy
SpEd 589 Seminar in Disabilities Studies
T&L 560 Research in Teaching: STEM Education

Electives

6 graded credits

Possibilities include coursework in the following:

  • School administration
  • Additional coursework from Teacher Leadership
  • Individualized internships
Graded Credits Minimum of 42 required
T&L 800 Research Credits, ungraded Minimum of 20 required
Additional credits 10 graded or ungraded

Program Total        

72 Credits

*Required and shared courses across EdD specializations of Teacher Leadership, Educational Leadership (Administration), and Higher Education Leadership.

**Required Teacher Leadership specialization course.

A maximum of nine transfer credits may be used toward the graded credit total.

Participants are required to participate in a minimum of two intensive two-week Summer Institutes. The Institute location will, for the immediate future, be in Pullman.

The priority application deadline is January 10 each year. Applications will be accepted after that date on a space available basis.

Teacher Leadership Ed.D. Application (Word) »

MASTER DEGREE IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Master’s degree options in educational leadership include the Master in Education (Ed.M.), a non-thesis degree designed for professional educators preparing for leadership positions in K-12 schools, and the Master of Arts in Education (M.A.), a thesis degree designed for professional educators who plan to subsequently pursue a research-based doctoral program.

WSU’s master’s degree programs in Educational Leadership have several unique features:

Statewide program delivery

Master’s degree students can access courses and work with advisers through all of WSU’s campuses (Pullman, Spokane, Tri-Cities, Vancouver).

A practitioner-scholar approach

Program content combines the best of both worlds—issues important to professional educators who are preparing for leadership positions in K-12 schools and the scholarship that can help to analyze and address these issues. The program faculty blends the strengths of academic scholars and experienced practitioners; while several faculty members are highly successful, experienced administrators, others are highly regarded academic scholars. Both contribute to the central purpose of the program, to prepare practitioner-scholars for leadership for school improvement.

Alignment with Certification Programs

WSU’s Educational Leadership master’s degree programs are closely aligned with the Principal and Program Administrator certification programs. All required graded courses for these certification programs can be applied to the master’s degree program of study. Course sequences are designed to permit students at any of WSU’s campuses to complete both the master’s degree and the principal or program administrator Certification program within two or three years.

Master of Education degree (Ed.M.)

The Master of Education Degree in Educational Leadership is a non-thesis degree program designed for professional educators preparing for leadership positions in K-12 schools. For the Ed.M. degree, the Program of Study requires a minimum of 35 semester hours, including at least 33 hours of graded coursework and 2 hours of EdAd 702 for completion of a master’s comprehensive examination.

Master of Arts degree (M.A.)

The Master of Arts Degree in Education is a thesis degree program designed for professional educators who plan to subsequently pursue a research-based doctoral program (Ph.D.). For the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree, the Program of Study requires a minimum of 30 semester hours, including at least 20 hours of graded coursework and 4 hours of EdAd 700 for completion and defense of the master’s thesis.

Master Ed Leadership Application Information (Word)»

Master Ed Leadership Factsheet (pdf)»

Master Ed Leadership Handbook (pdf)»

MASTERS DEGREES IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

The WSU College of Education Department of Teaching and Learning offers two master's degrees in Curriculum and Instruction on the Spokane campus. If you seek K-12 Teacher Certification as part of your graduate program, you must pursue the MIT.  If you are completing the Professional Certificate Program as part of a master’s degree, then this Ed.M. is the degree for you. There is considerable flexibility to tailor a program of study to your individual educational and professional goals. Your unique program of study is developed in collaboration with your adviser and master’s degree committee.

Additionally, students may combine the Ed.M. in Curriculum and Instruction degree program with WSU endorsements offered in Spokane (Reading, Middle Level Math, Special Education) or with an online English Language Learner (ELL) endorsement offered through  WSU Distance Degree Programs.

Master of Education Degree (Ed.M.)

The Master of Education (Ed.M.) degree is designed for students wishing to extend their knowledge and skills in education, expand their content knowledge, and/or pursue leadership roles in schools and organizations/agencies. The Ed.M. degree program consists of a minimum of 35 credits, 33 of which must be graded course work.  A minimum of one, three-credit research course must be included in the 33 graded credits. A minimum of two credits of T&L 702 are required and usually involve research/scholarship activities associated with the special project and final oral examination. The performance criteria in T&L 702 are based on a satisfactory/fail scale, as opposed to a letter grade.

This Ed.M. may be combined with available endorsement programs and/or  Professional Certification program.
Students may  pursue the Washington State Professional Certification within this Ed.M. degree program. The Pro Cert pre-assessment seminar (T&L 541, three credits) and culminating assessment seminar (T&L 543, three credits) are required for the Professional Certification program. These courses may be part of the minimum of 33 graded course credits in the Ed.M. program.

Similarly, the Ed.M. and the Pro Cert may be combined with  endorsement programs offered live or ONLINE through the College of Education distance degree programming (DDP). Options include endorsements Reading, Middle Level Math, f English Language Learners and Special Education.

Master of Arts Degree (M.A.)

The Master of Arts (MA) degree is designed for students who desire to study and explore educational research. The MA degree is well suited for those students wishing to eventually pursue a doctoral degree or a research/leadership role in schools or organizations/agencies. The MA degree program consists of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours, 21 of which must be graded course work. Three research courses, three credits each, are a component of the 21 graded credits. A minimum of nine additional credits of T&L 700 (independent research work) are required and usually involve research/scholarship activities associated with the thesis and final oral examination.  The performance criteria in T&L 700 are based on a satisfactory/fail scale, as opposed to a letter grade. 

T&L Master Degree Application and Instructions (Word)»

T&L Master Degree Handbook (pdf)»

MASTER IN TEACHING PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Apply now for admission to the Master in Teaching (MIT) program. The next cohort starts summer session, June 2013. Applications are currently being accepted and are due November 16, 2012. Late applications will be considered on a space-available basis.

The MIT program is for an individual who holds a baccalaureate degree in a field other than education and who wants to become a teacher. Students are selected through a careful screening process that seeks those who are not only academically capable but who are especially devoted to the education of children.

The degree is available through a full-time, cohort-based program. When you join the MIT program, you join a group of students who continue through the program together, providing a supportive learning environment.

The MIT program at Washington State University Spokane is an intensive, integrated course of study and field experiences (51 graduate credits) that is completed in 12 months and provides: 

  • all coursework to meet the state of Washington K-8 certification; 
  • a Constructivist approach to teaching and learning; and
  • a range of diverse-learner experiences. 

This graduate degree is delivered from the Washington State University Pullman campus via live, interactive courses broadcast over the Academic Media System (AMS). Some instruction will be live in Spokane and your faculty advisor and clinical supervisor for your internships in the public schools will be Spokane faculty. 

Students begin their coursework in summer session, continue with classes and add pre-internship experiences at school sites during the fall semester, do their full-time student teaching (12-week internship) in the spring semester, and complete additional coursework the following summer. 

Effective teaching in today's schools requires that teachers draw upon students' social, cultural, linguistic, and academic strengths in the teaching and learning process. In order to accomplish this complex task, teachers must have an understanding of learners, learning and teaching, and be reflective in their practice.

Elementary MIT Application and Information Packet (Word)»

Secondary MIT Application and Information Packet (pdf)»

Please note: The secondary MIT students should expect to travel to Pullman in order to complete methods and other classes that are not  available in Spokane via interactive video conference programming.

Education

CONTACT US

Master in Teaching
Leslie Hall, PhD
ldhall@wsu.edu
Phone: (509) 358-7546

Program information
Kelly LaGrutta
Academic Coordinator
lagrutta@wsu.edu
Phone: (509) 358-7942